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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 5

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 5
British European Airways Corporation (BEA)


England flag England

This V.701 series Viscount was built for
British European Airways Corporation (BEA) as G-ALWF

It first flew on Wednesday, 3 December 1952 at Weybridge, Surrey, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 505 engines.


During its life this aircraft was also owned and/or operated by
Channel Airways, British Eagle International Airlines, Cambrian Airways and the Viscount Preservation Trust


Photo of Viscount c/n 5
Duxford Aviation Society (DAS)


England flag England

Its final owner/operator was
Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) as G-ALWF.

Its fate:-
Withdrawn from service by Cambrian Airways and stored at Rhoose Airport, Cardiff, Wales 24 December 1971.

Saved by the Viscount Preservation Trust and now preserved by the Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) within the Imperial War Museum facility at Duxford Airfield, Cambridgeshire, England in early British European Airways (BEA) livery.

The aircraft was initially loaned for a period of 99 years but on 26 November 2011 the title of the aircraft was officially handed over to the Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) by Paul St John Turner and Romer Adams who founded the Viscount Preservation Trust when they first purchased 'WF' in April 1972.


Operational record
Photo of Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

January 1950 to January 1953

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

August 1949
Discussions concluded between Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd and British European Airways Corporation (BEA) regarding the specification for the V.701 aircraft.

Accommodation for 47 passengers at a gross weight of 53,000 lbs was specified with Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 505 engines.

2 January 1950
Registered to Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd.

3 August 1950
Order placed by British European Airways Corporation (BEA) for 20 V.701 aircraft which was later increased to 26.

This was the 2nd V.701 ordered by British European Airways Corporation (BEA).

Production as a V.702 stopped and the aircraft was completed as a V.701 in 40/47 seat configuration.

Production Aircraft No. 2 - the 2nd production V.700 series Viscount built,
was the 2nd Viscount fuselage assembled at Weybridge, Surrey, England,
and the 2nd Viscount assembled at Weybridge, Surrey, England.

Production Order No. F02/701. Sales Order No. 02/84A. Stock Order No. 02/10B.

30 December 1951
Fuselage assembly commenced at Weybridge Airfield, Surrey, England.

29 January 1952
Fuselage off jig.

28 February 1952
Fuselage to Erecting Shop 'E' at Weybridge Airfield, Surrey, England.

11 November 1952
Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 505 engines first run.

3 December 1952
First flight from Weybridge Airfield, Surrey, England.

It landed at Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England for fitting out and test flying as the runway at Weybridge was too short for a completed aircraft to takeoff.

1 January 1953
Registration to Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd cancelled as aircraft sold to British European Airways Corporation (BEA).


Photo of British European Airways Corporation (BEA) Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

January 1953 to December 1963

British European Airways Corporation (BEA)

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

1 January 1953
Purchased from Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd.

2 January 1953
Registered to British European Airways Corporation (BEA).

19 January 1953
Noted at Christchurch Airfield, Hampshire, England having diverted from Hurn for some reason.

9 February 1953
Certificate of Airworthiness issued by the Air Registration Board.

13 February 1953
Delivered to British European Airways (BEA) named as 'R M A Sir John Franklin'.

It was delivered fitted with Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 505 engines with serial numbers: 1016 and 1006 on the port side and 1004 and 1007 on the starboard side.

The cabin was originally fitted out with 40 seats in a four-abreast (2 + 2) all-first class interior, but it was re-configured as a 47 seat all-tourist class layout before it entered service.

It was initially used for crew training and route proving flights.

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd, Invoice C/VW/46457, Dated 13 February 1953,
Amount £183,666 2s 11d + £101 7s 5d (delivery fuel + 3% fuel handling charge + oil).

15 March 1953
First noted at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England.

17 April 1953
Full commercial type certification issued to British European Airways Corporation (BEA) for the V.701 series.

17 April 1953
Ferried from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England for modification work.

19 April 1953
Returned to British European Airways (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

18 April 1953
First V.701 service commenced from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Nicosia Airport, Cyprus via Ciampino Airport, Rome, Italy and Ellinikon Airport, Athens, Greece and was operated by sister Viscount G-AMNY (C/N 6). The Athens - Nicosia leg was operated by Cyprus Airways under a charter agreement with BEA - British European Airways. This was the world’s first regular scheduled service using a turboprop aircraft, and the second one was operated by G-ALWF.

19 April 1953
V.701 service commenced from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Yesilkoy Airport, Istanbul, Turkey.

1953
BRITISH PATHE FILM ARCHIVE

British European Airways (BEA) Viscounts G-ALWF (c/n 5) arriving at Ciampino Airport, Rome, Italy and G-ALWE (c/n 4) departing.

British Pathe Film Archive


14 July 1953
Ferried from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England for modification work.

21 August 1953
Returned to British European Airways (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

1954 to c1961
The original ‘cutlass’ design propeller blades were gradually replaced by new symmetrical ‘needle’ blade propeller sets. From photographic evidence, both propeller types were fitted to Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 505 and Mark 506 engines and many V.701 aircraft flew with an ‘intermix’ of both types of propeller blades.

10 May 1954
Ferried from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England for modification work.

24 May 1954
Returned to British European Airways (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

12 December 1954
Suffered a partial starboard undercarriage collapse during a crew training landing at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England.

Cause: The starboard undercarriage back-stay bracket failed, due to chronic metal fatigue of the bottom attachment bolts.

Repaired locally and returned to service.

19 January 1955
The aircraft was dismantled by Eagle Airways Ltd and trucked by road to the Marshall's facility at Teversham Airport, Cambridge, England for repairs.

19 May 1955
Returned to British European Airways (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

All British European Airways Corporation (BEA) V.701 aircraft were gradually retrofitted to V.701A standard.

May 1955 to December 1956
All BEA V.701 aircraft were gradually retrofitted with Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 506 engines in place of the original Mk.505 engines. Aircraft are known to have flown with an ‘intermix’ of both engine marks between these dates. When completely retro-fitted with Mark 506 engines, the V.701A designation was applied to these aircraft although this has not been seen widely used or quoted.

28 July 1955
After departing from Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam's runway 24 on a flight to Heathrow Airport, London a bird strike was reported by the flight crew and they elected to return to Schiphol for an inspection, where they found that they had struck a flock of small ducks. Ingestion of birds into the Dart engine can cause a loss of power and blockage of the air fed oil seals.

16 October 1955
Ferried from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Teversham Airport, Cambridge, England for modification work with Marshall's.

23 December 1955
Returned to British European Airways (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

21 May 1956
Undercarriage damaged during a training flight landing at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England.

22 October 1956
Ferried from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England for wing spar modification work.

19 February 1957
Returned to British European Airways Corporation (BEA) at Heathrow Airport, London, England.

21 January 1958
Noted at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England carrying out crew training flights.

21 March 1958
Burst a tyre at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England during a crew training landing.

Painted in the BEA ‘Red Square‘ livery.
BEA
‘Red Square‘ livery

March 1959
A new BEA 'Red Square' livery was adopted and aircraft were repainted during the early 1960s when they next went in for overhaul.

31 March 1959
Converted from 40/47 seats to 60/63 seats in a new 'high density' configuration.

This modification also entailed the installation of an 11th standard size window on the rear starboard side and a small window behind the rear entrance door on the port side.

1 May 1959
Last noted at Blackbushe Airport, Hampshire, England.

31 March 1963
All BEA V.701 series Viscounts were retired by this date with a fleet total of over 6,000,000 passengers and over 3,000,000 miles.

6 December 1963
Sold to Channel Airways.

FURTHER READING: Books about BEA - British European Airways



Photo of Channel Airways Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

December 1963 to November 1964

Channel Airways

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

6 December 1963
Purchased from British European Airways (BEA).

13 March 1964
Registered to Channel Airways.

16 March 1964
Delivered to Southend Airport, Rochford, Essex, England from Heathrow Airport, London, England.

18 April 1964
Entered service from Southend Airport, Rochford, Essex, England to Zestienhoven Airport, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

18 November 1964
Leased to British Eagle International Airlines.


Photo of British Eagle International Airlines Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

November 1964 to May 1965

British Eagle International Airlines

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

18 November 1964
Leased from Channel Airways. Delivered to British Eagle International Airlines at Speke Airport, Liverpool, England in full British Eagle livery.

1965
Named as 'City of Exeter'.

26 May 1965
Returned to Channel Airways.


Photo of Channel Airways Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

May 1965 to December 1965

Channel Airways

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

26 May 1965
Returned from British Eagle International Airlines lease to Southend Airport, Rochford, Essex, England from Speke Airport, Liverpool, England in full British Eagle livery minus titles. It it thought that it continued to operate Channel services without being repainted or with any titles applied. Can anyone confirm this.

10 June 1965
Registration cancelled? Note, this date is before the aircraft operated its final service!

17 June 1965
Operated a flight for British Eagle International Airlines out of Heathrow Airport, London, England.

26 November 1965
Final service from Jersey Airport, Channel Islands to Southend Airport, Rochford, Essex, England and withdrawn from service, stored and offered up for sale.

15 December 1965
Sold to Cambrian Airways.


Photo of Cambrian Airways Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

December 1965 to April 1972

Cambrian Airways

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

15 December 1965
Purchased from Channel Airways and delivered to Marshalls at Teversham Airport, Cambridge, England for overhaul.

18 January 1966
Registered to Cambrian Airways.

13 February 1966
Delivered from Teversham Airport, Cambridge, England to Speke Airport, Liverpool, England.

Based at Rhoose Airport, Cardiff, Wales 'WF' was affectionately known at Cambrian Airways as 'Woolly Fox'.

November 1967
Cambrian Airways became a wholly owned subsidiary of British Air Services and the name was added to the aircraft.

Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'White Cabin' livery.
Cambrian Airways
'White Cabin' livery

circa 1968
Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'White Cabin' livery.

Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'BAS - British Air Services' livery.
Cambrian Airways
'BAS - British Air Services' livery

circa 1969
Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'BAS - British Air Services' livery.

Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'Blue Tail' livery.
Cambrian Airways
'Blue Tail' livery

circa 1970
Painted in the Cambrian Airways 'Blue Tail' livery.

24 December 1971
Withdrawn from service at Rhoose Airport, Cardiff, Wales after a flight from Aldergrove Airport, Belfast, Northern Ireland via Lulsgate Airport, Bristol, England.

Now the oldest Viscount in existence efforts were made by Cambrian Airways to have it preserved. It was eventually decided that 'WF' would be sold to the Viscount Preservation Trust to be displayed to the public at Speke Airport, Liverpool, England.

12 April 1972
Purchased by the Viscount Preservation Trust.


Photo of Viscount Preservation Trust Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

April 1972 to May 1976

Viscount Preservation Trust

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

12 April 1972
Purchased from Cambrian Airways.

The crew were:- Carol James, Brian Ainsworth (Chief Steward), Elizabeth Phillips, Geoff Perrott (Chief Pilot), John Nelmes and Rita Mitchell.

12 April 1972
Delivered to the Viscount Preservation Trust at Speke Airport, Liverpool, England from Rhoose Airport, Cardiff, Wales via Heathrow Airport, London, England, as Flight CS1972. The crew consisted of:- Captain and Chief Pilot Geoff A Perrott, Captain John Nelmes, Chief Steward Brian Ainsworth and Stewardesses Carol James, Elizabeth Phillips and Rita Mitchell. Passengers on board for this final days flying included Sir George Edwards - designer of the Viscount and Captain Austin John Brown. The delivery trip was organised by Paul St John Turner.

On arrival at Liverpool the aircraft was placed on display at the back of No.1 hangar, the airport’s main maintenance hangar, that had been provided free of charge by the Corporation of Liverpool. It has been estimated that 'WF' had flown approximately 7 million miles and carried in excess of 800,000 passengers.

16 April 1972
Certificate of Airworthiness expired.

18 April 1972
Registration cancelled as permanently withdrawn from use. Total time 28,299 hours and 25,938 total landings.

Aircraft officially opened to the public by the Lord Mayor of Liverpool as the oldest turbine airliner in existence.

5 December 1972
Aircraft officially opened to the public by the Lord Mayor of Liverpool as the oldest turbine airliner in existence. Access necessitated the public being allowed into an otherwise restricted area.

1973
New security regulations were introduced that caused the access arrangement to the aircraft to be ended. By this time over 4,000 people had visited 'WF'. Outer wing sections were removed by Cambrian Airways and transferred to Viscounts c/n 7 G-AMOG and c/n 27 G-AMON. Other serviceable equipment was also removed. The aircraft was moved out of hangar No.1 and placed in open storage with its future in doubt, with the possibility of it having to be scrapped.

A team of around twelve DAS - Duxford Aviation Society volunteers made the 200 mile journey to Speke Airport, Liverpool, England every weekend to dismantle ‘WF'.

Late 1975
Agreement in principle to loan the aircraft to DAS - Duxford Aviation Society from the Viscount Preservation Trust who had purchased it from Cambrian Airways (now part of British Airways (BA)). The two people involved in negotiating an agreement with Duxford were Paul St John Turner and Romer Adams who had originally set up the Viscount Preservation Trust in order to ensure that 'WF', which was the oldest surviving Viscount had a secure future.

November 1975 - February 1976
A team of around twelve DAS - Duxford Aviation Society volunteers made the 200 mile journey to Speke Airport, Liverpool, England every weekend to dismantle ‘WF' in preparation for its relocation to the Imperial War Museum, Duxford Airfield, Cambridgeshire, England. By 15 February 1976 the work was complete and the parts loaded onto trailers.

Fuselage delivered by road from Speke Airport, Liverpool, England to Duxford Airfield, Cambridgeshire, England.

22 February 1976
Fuselage delivered by road from Speke Airport, Liverpool, England to Duxford Airfield, Cambridgeshire, England on a special Crane Fruehauf telescopic 'trombone' articulated trailer towed by a 'D' Series Ford with the wings following a week later. Stored outside in Cambrian Airways livery, restoration began immediately which included replacing the missing outer wing sections that came from Viscount F-BLHI (C/N 36) supplied by Alidair at East Midlands Airport, Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England.

22 May 1976
The aircraft was formerly loaned to the DAS - Duxford Aviation Society for a period of 99 years.


Photo of Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) Viscount G-ALWF

Country of Registration United Kingdom

May 1976 to

Duxford Aviation Society (DAS)

G-ALWF - c/n 5 - a V.701 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

22 May 1976
The aircraft was formerly loaned to Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) from the Viscount Preservation Trust for a period of 99 years.

1976
Re-assembly was carried out in the open as there was no suitable covered accommodation available at Duxford Airfield. Work took several years to complete as replacements for some missing components taken while the aircraft was at Speke had to be sourced and acquired. The restoration team at Duxford felt that G-ALWF must have had a reasonable amount of fatigue life left on the wing spars as she had been re-sparred twice during her life.

The refurbishment, both external and internal, by the aircraft’s small but dedicated team continued through the 1980s.

The treatment of external corrosion, a legacy from when the aircraft was exposed to the salty air of the Mersey estuary while outside at Speke Airport, was a priority. The refurbishment, both external and internal, by the aircraft’s small but dedicated team continued through the 1980s and was almost complete by mid 1986, some ten years after the aircraft arrived at Duxford Airfield.

The Cambrian Airways markings had gradually faded away so work started to repaint it in its original British European Airways (BEA) livery.

1984 - 1985
The Cambrian Airways markings had gradually faded away so work started to repaint it in its original British European Airways (BEA) livery named 'R M A Sir John Franklin'. All the work was carried out in the open air when weather allowed it, which took a year to complete. The Union Jack flag on the tail was the only part that was poorly done.

Repainted in British European Airways (BEA) livery named 'R M A Sir John Franklin'.

1987
On completion of the external refurbishment, work now concentrated on the interior. The passenger compartment was fitted out in a 63 seat configuration, that necessitated the removal of what remained of the original but incomplete galley. The seats, which were not the original ones, were brought up to display standard, and a new carpet was fitted. The flight deck also received a lot of attention – it was estimated that around 70 per cent of the instruments had to be sourced and fitted, and the crew seats were renovated.

25 November 1992
Moved into Hangar 2 and jacked up to allow repair and refurbishment of the main undercarriage. Other components including the propellers, engine cowlings, panels and fairings were also removed to allow access to the main structure for some badly-needed refurbishment. Some components were replaced by spares donated by companies that included British Air Ferries (BAF) and Thameside Aero Spares Ltd.

April 1993
Started a move from Hangar 2 to Hangar 1 for another complete external repaint, this time to be done under contract by the Duxford based ARC - Aircraft Restoration Company.

18 April 1993
While on its journey from Hangar 2 to Hangar 1 'WF' was parked close to the live side of the airfield to take part in a celebration to mark the 40th anniversary of the first scheduled flight by a Viscount. British World Airlines (BWA) parked V.806 Viscount c/n 263 G-AOYN close to 'WF' for the celebrations. BWA had operated the special flight to Duxford from their base at Southend Airport, Rochford, Essex, England via the Brooklands Museum at Weybridge, Surrey, England, for a group of aircraft enthusiasts.

21 April 1993
Completed the move into Hangar 1 for repainting by the ARC - Aircraft Restoration Company and preparation work started. While this work was progressing the DAS - Duxford Aviation Society team refurbished smaller components, repaired engine cowlings, and prepared replacement flaps that had been supplied by World Aviation Support.

1 July 1993
Re-painting began.

7 August 1993
Fuselage lettering was applied in the form of decals.

17 August 1993
Rolled out of Hangar 1 painted in British European Airways (BEA) livery named as 'RMA Sir John Franklin and positioned outside.

1993
Work continued mostly on the interior, and included repairing leaks in the structure and the flight deck and cabin windows that had allowed the ingress of rainwater. Corrosion was dealt with and preservative sprayed throughout the aircraft’s structure where necessary.

'WF' was normally opened to the public only on Duxford airshow days.

'WF' was normally opened to the public only on Duxford airshow days where the opportunity to look inside the aircraft and see the progress with its refurbishment always proved to be popular. It was surprising just how many visitors claimed to have had an association with 'WF' during its days in airline service, either by working on it or having flown on it as a passenger. Invariably people were surprised to see that it still existed and was being maintained in such good condition.

2005
Selected as one of the aircraft to be displayed inside the new 'AirSpace' hangar and work started on another lengthy refurbishment.

Completely stripped of paint for repainting in British European Airways (BEA) livery named as 'RMA Sir John Franklin'.

August 2005
Completely stripped of paint by Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) staff and volunteers, the aircraft was moved to Hangar 2 at Duxford for repainting in BEA - British European Airways livery named as 'R M A Sir John Franklin'. Many panels required a lot of attention in the Duxford Aviation Society's workshops. The work could not be completed within the allocated time in the hangar so had to be finished off outside.

In the latter part of July 2006 the aircraft was moved into the new 'AirSpace' hangar at Duxford.

July 2006
In the latter part of July the aircraft was moved into the new 'AirSpace' hangar at Duxford but was not made available for public viewing due to the continuing work on the hangar. These works also meant that G-ALWF was not available to the volunteer crew to complete their refurbishments. Because of problems in locating all of the aircraft planned for inclusion in the 'AirSpace' hangar, it was decided that ‘WF would have to be excluded. As the Duxford Aviation Society's de Havilland DH106 Comet 4 G-APDB had not yet been repainted in BOAC livery, ‘WF' was allowed to occupy its allotted space on a temporary basis until the Comet was ready.

26 August 2006
The 'AirSpace' hangar was made available to visitors in preparation for Duxford’s Spitfire 70th Anniversary Airshow on 2/3 September. With the process of installing aircraft within 'AirSpace' and the first phase of the exhibitions now complete, the IWM - Imperial War Museum Duxford was delighted to announce that 'AirSpace' will remain open.

Placed in the Conservation area of the Airspace museum at Duxford.

2007
G-ALWF's place in the 'AirSpace' hangar was given over to de Havilland DH106 Comet 4 G-APDB for positioning in the display area before the building was officially opened. 'WF' then spent some time outside, before being put into the conservation area at the front of the 'AirSpace' hangar, but this was not a permanent arrangement.

7 and 8 July 2007
Noted on display outside the 'AirSpace' hangar during the 'Flying Legends' Air Show.

It was intended that G-ALWF will rotate between the conservation area in 'AirSpace' hangar and the outside areas depending on the requirements of the conservation area. It was now doubtful that G-ALWF would go into 'AirSpace' hangar permanently.

October 2007
Floor covering at the rear passenger door area replaced and new passenger and crew entrance steps had been manufactured and supplied. Access to the aircraft by the general public was not possible due to on-going restoration works.

Unfortunately while the Viscount has been in the Conservation area of the Airspace museum at Duxford, the restoration team have not been allowed to work on it by the Imperial War Museum.

G-ALWF has now been placed outside and is alongside other civil aircraft on the public side of the airfield barrier at Duxford.

February 2010
G-ALWF has now been placed outside and is alongside other civil aircraft on the public side of the airfield barrier at Duxford Airfield.

16th May 2010
Opened to the public during the Duxford May air show.

Plans were made to open the aircraft during the Duxford 2010 air show season, and at times when the preservation crew were in attendance dependant on work being carried out with safety in mind.

The 'Duxford Aviation Society' and the 'Vickers Viscount Network' hosted 'Duxford's Viscount Day'.

31 July 2010
The 'Duxford Aviation Society' and the 'Vickers Viscount Network' hosted 'Duxford's Viscount Day', a tribute to 'The Turboprop World-Beater Viscount' and the worlds oldest surviving Viscount G-ALWF c/n 5. 66 delegates attended a very successful day that included talks and tours of G-ALWF.

Report of the days event


It was possible during 2010 to open the aircraft to the public at all of the Duxford air shows, which proved to be extremely popular with visitors and generated extra revenue.

The paintwork on the propellers suffered from being outside with bare metal beginning to show through.

November 2010
The paintwork on the propellers suffered from being outside with bare metal beginning to show through. Although conditions for re-painting them outside are particularly unfavourable at this time of the year a decision was made by the preservation crew to do the repair work throughout the winter months as the weather permits. The main aim is to give them at least some form of protection throughout the winter months with final coats being applied in better weather next year. By 7 November the blades had been rubbed down and a primer and undercoat applied.

Richard Stanton presented a large photograph of 'Whiskey Fox' on the production line at Weybridge, Surrey, England to John Overhill.

26 April 2011
Vickers Viscount Network Website researcher Richard Stanton presented a large photograph of 'Whiskey Fox' on the production line at Weybridge to John Overhill who is part of the Duxford Aviation Society's team of volunteers that look after this Viscount at the Cambridgeshire airfield. Richard discovered the original photograph at the Brooklands Museum and gained permission to get a modern print produced to a professional standard. John intends to display the photograph inside the aircraft so that visitors can see what it looked like during its construction in 1952. Fittingly, the handover ceremony took place at Brooklands Museum in front of Viscount G-APIM (C/N 412).

Maintenance performed to the locking mechanism inside the port rear door.
Maintenance the port rear door

19 August 2011
Maintenance performed to the locking mechanism inside the port rear door and the propellers were painted ready to withstand another winter outside.

26 November 2011
A meeting at Duxford between members of the Duxford Aviation Society (DAS) board and the two original members of the Viscount Preservation Trust, namely Paul St John Turner and Romer Adams saw the official handover of the title of 'WF' to the Duxford Aviation Society (DAS). Since its arrival at Duxford in 1976 it had been on loan for a period of 99 years but both parties felt it was the right time to transfer the title over to the organisation responsible for its continued preservation.

G-ALWF anniversary cakes.
G-ALWF anniversary cakes

3 December 2012
The Duxford Aviation Society Viscount Team celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of the first flight of this aircraft from Weybridge, Surrey, England. 36 special cakes were made and tea was appropriately served in an old BEA silver service pot.

DAS - Duxford Aviation Society website



Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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